The Jazz Session #502: Cooper-Moore (2009)

(Photo by Peter Ganushkin)

In this archive interview from December 2009 (updated with a new intro), Cooper-Moore talks about his childhood days as the town musician; why he feels that playing music is far more than a profession; how and why he began creating his own instruments; and more.

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I’ve been recording conversations with jazz musicians since 2007. I think it’s important work that deserves public support. I’d also like to be able to do it for my living. If you agree that The Jazz Session is worth supporting, become a member today at thejazzsession.com/join. For $5 a month you’ll get a monthly bonus episode, early access to every show, and a yearly gift. For $10 a month you get all that plus an extra bonus show exploring a classic jazz album. Big thanks to Ron Weinstock for becoming a member.

The Jazz Session #501: Roberta Piket

Pianist Roberta Piket recorded an entire album of her husband Billy Mintz’s compositions as a surprise birthday gift for him. Now we’re all receiving a present, because Piket decided to release the record, which is called Domestic Harmony – Piket Plays Mintz (Thirteenth Note Records, 2019). In this interview, Piket talks about the recording process; Mintz’s reaction on hearing the record; her approach to solo piano; and, interestingly, the actor Brent Spiner.

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I’ve been recording conversations with jazz musicians since 2007. I think it’s important work that deserves public support. I’d also like to be able to do it for my living. If you agree that The Jazz Session is worth supporting, become a member today at thejazzsession.com/join. For $5 a month you’ll get a monthly bonus episode, early access to every show, and a yearly gift. For $10 a month you get all that plus an extra bonus show exploring a classic jazz album. Big thanks to Russell Archibald for becoming a member.

The Jazz Session #498: Steve Kuhn (2009)

This week we’re stepping into the wayback machine for a 2009 interview with pianist Steve Kuhn about his album Mostly Coltrane (ECM, 2009). Kuhn worked with Coltrane for several weeks in the early 60s. In this interview, Kuhn talks about Coltrane, the Lenox School of Jazz, his composing methods, and the support he received early on from Bill Evans. He also discusses the sacrifices he made in pursuit of his musical vision.

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I’ve been recording conversations with jazz musicians since 2007. I think it’s important work that deserves public support. I’d also like to be able to do it for my living. If you agree that The Jazz Session is worth supporting, become a member today at thejazzsession.com/join. For $5 a month you’ll get a monthly bonus episode, early access to every show, and a yearly gift. For $10 a month you get all that plus an extra bonus show exploring a classic jazz album. Big thanks to Mark Redmond, the newest member of the show.

The Jazz Session #497: John Medeski

John Medeski has many irons in the fire, one of which is his new project Mad Skillet, featuring guitarist Will Bernard, sousaphonist Kirk Joseph and drummer Terence Higgins (the latter two from the Dirty Dozen Brass Band). In this interview, Medeski talks about the new album Mad Skillet; how honesty fuels his music and his sound; and the many projects he’s working on at the moment.

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I’ve been recording conversations with jazz musicians since 2007. I think it’s important work that deserves public support. I’d also like to be able to do it for my living. If you agree that The Jazz Session is worth supporting, become a member today at thejazzsession.com/join. For $5 a month you’ll get a monthly bonus episode, early access to every show, and a yearly gift. For $10 a month you get all that plus an extra bonus show exploring a classic jazz album. Big thanks to Jon Lost, the newest member of the show.

The Jazz Session #496: Andrés Vial

Gang of Three is the new album from Montreal-based pianist Andrés Vial. In this interview, Vial talks about the relationship between Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell and Elmo Hope that inspired the album; how he ended up in the studio with Dezron Douglas and Eric McPherson; creating an instrumental piece from the words of a poem; and more.

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I’ve been recording conversations with jazz musicians since 2007. I think it’s important work that deserves public support. I’d also like to be able to do it for my living. If you agree that The Jazz Session is worth supporting, become a member today at thejazzsession.com/join. For $5 a month you’ll get a monthly bonus episode, early access to every show, and a yearly gift. For $10 a month you get all that plus an extra bonus show exploring a classic jazz album.